Common myths about pelvic floor – July 2022


July 5, 2022

This month’s blog comes from Daniela Long, Clinical Specialist Physiotherapist in Pelvic Health

Although it is one of the ways you can identify (find) your pelvic floor muscles, doing it daily as an exercise can be harmful and can increase the risk of urinary infections and for the bladder not to empty properly. It is also very unlikely that one contraction will improve your pelvic floor.

Your pelvic floor can weaken during pregnancy by 25 per cent. It is more common to experience urinary incontinence after vaginal delivery, but the rates of faecal incontinence and sexual dysfunction can be higher after caesarian delivery (Baud, D. at all 2020).

Some women will have weak pelvic floor, which can lead to problems with stress incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse. However it is not uncommon to have a tight pelvic floor, leading to painful sex and other pelvic health issues. Tight pelvic floor is not strong pelvic floor. For the best pelvic floor, women need to be able to contract and relax.


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